You can’t talk about guns and self defence in Canada

Vancouver school trustee, Sharon Gregson, has come out of the closet and admitted the unthinkable. She is a gun owner and a competitive shooter! Not only that. She has applied for a Utah concealed carry permit and thinks that a Canadian discussion about self-defence would be a worthwhile exercise, Even worse, she made the statement that if someone in the Engineering classroom at Montreal’s Polytechnique had been armed when Mark Lepine went on his murderous rampage there was a good chance that he could have been stopped before he killed the 14 young women.

John Les, B.C.s’s Solicitor General, immediately jumped into the fray, saying that Gregson had “crossed the line by advocating that she and other Canadians be allowed to carry concealed guns as can be done in many U.S. states”. On Gregson’s argument that it should be easier to obtain permits for concealed carry, particularly in the case of women who feel threatened, Les continued his rant saying, “I don’t care whether it’s a U.S. state or a Canadian province. I just don’t think it’s necessary to be carrying a concealed handgun. Full stop, period”.

Crossed the line? Les sounds more like a federal Liberal than a member of the provincial Liberal party. Or is that really the provincial Liberal position?

Of course the Coalition for Gun Control’s Wendy Cuckier was also polled for her reaction and of course was “appalled” and said that Gregson was sending out a “dangerous message by advocating putting guns into the hands of more women”.

Maybe “dangerous” to Cuckier’s agenda.

It’s fascinating to see how the debate – if you can call it that – plays out.

Gregson says, “What I’m advocating for is, at least, a discussion in Canada about where we want to be in the long term around guns, so that we are formulating our public policy based on research and experience, not on an automatic knee-jerk reaction that guns are bad”.

Cuckier says, “I don’t think think we need to have a wider debate about carrying concealed weapons and handguns for self protection. It runs contrary to Canadian tradition and it certainly runs contrary to Canadian law”.

Translation: I don’t agree with it, ergo I don’t want to talk about it.

What I would like to know is when self defence became a bad thing in Canada. Who in hell made that decision for us?

I also get the distinct feeling that there is a mindset amongst some people that would rather see people dead than be given the opportunity to defend themselves.

And isn’t it odd that a Canadian citizen can get a concealed carry permit in the U.S. while you can’t even talk about self defence in Canada without coming under attack. Doesn’t it seem even stranger that the U.S. government trusts Canadian citizens more than our own government?

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11 Responses to “You can’t talk about guns and self defence in Canada”

  1. Annomus Says:

    ouch our governmet just got OWNED with the sentence “And isn’t it odd that a Canadian citizen can get a concealed carry permit in the U.S. while you can’t even talk about self defence in Canada without coming under attack. Doesn’t it seem even stranger that the U.S. government trusts Canadian citizens more than our own government?” I think is\ts because we are i democrocy i say we need republic it would be alot better 20 person council instead of 1 person running it all.

  2. Annomus Says:

    ouch our governmet just got OWNED with the sentence “And isn’t it odd that a Canadian citizen can get a concealed carry permit in the U.S. while you can’t even talk about self defence in Canada without coming under attack. Doesn’t it seem even stranger that the U.S. government trusts Canadian citizens more than our own government?” I think is\ts because we are i democrocy i say we need republic it would be alot better 20 person council instead of 1 person running it all.

  3. Jack Bauer Says:

    Ouch, our government just got OWNED with the comment “And isn’t it odd that a Canadian citizen can get a concealed carry permit in the U.S. while you can’t even talk about self defence in Canada without coming under attack. Doesn’t it seem even stranger that the U.S. government trusts Canadian citizens more than our own government?” I think it is because we are a Democrocy i say we need republic it would be alot better 20 person council instead of 1 person running it all.

  4. just ryan Says:

    wow there is a lot of cut and pasting going on here ok well I truly believe that conceal and carry laws will benefit all Canadians. except for criminals of all kinds like murderers! rapists! and robbers! I am not saying that we have to tare a page from the American book and call it our own but I think that we can do it better. And we should do it for the safety of all law abiding Canadians we can put in more background checks and mandatory safety course attendance as well as a strict controls of calibre and concealment. For example huge steel jacketed ammo should not be leangle for concealed carry because it can penetrate walls and hurt un intended bystanders. and there should be a mandatory amount of range time per year or even per quarter (4 times pure year) by range time I mean time at a shooting club practising with the carried firearm honing accuracy once again for the safety of bystanders. These rules on top of our already existing laws on restricted firearms (had guns are in this category ) that require cretin licensing and registration for leangle ownership I think Canada can and should conceder and implement our own concealed carry laws for the porpoise of self defence and the added perk of crime prevention

  5. Avid gun owner Says:

    Well first off, just ryan, you may want to run spell check before submitting your post. Honestly not to be rude but I wouldn’t give someone a license to carry a concealed weapon that cant spell. Again no offense but come on… leangle? Legal. Pretty important considering the topic. Anyway now that I’m done with making myself out to be an asshole. On to my opinion.

    While I do think it would be nice to have some sort of concealed carry permit, other than the nearly impossible to attain permit currently in legislation, it would require a huge amount of planning, both for safety and also on implementation. It is one thing to pass a law in parliament, it is entirely another matter to actually put something like this in place. There would be the actual monetary “costs”, and on top of that there would be training to be developed, both for citizens looking to acquire the permit, and for law enforcement officers that now need to assume that every person they interact with is carrying a firearm. Not to say they are less concerned right now, safety first people.
    Next would be another administrative nightmare, registration and databases. The government is already fighting a losing battle with the current gun registration system, let alone keeping track of this new set of information. While it may seem that I am against the passing of legislature allowing Canadian citizens to carry concealed weapons, the fact of the matter is completely the opposite.

    Fact: Nearly 22% of Canadian households had at least one firearm as of 1996, including 2.3% of households possessing a handgun.(1)

    Fact: The large majority of police-reported violent crimes do not involve a firearm. In 2006, a firearm was used against 2.4% of
    victims of violent crime. Physical force and threatening behaviour were much more common, accounting for three-quarters
    of all victimizations.(2)

    The biggest issue I have been hearing when the topic of concealed carry comes up (or firearms in general) is that they are dangerous, if people have them they will be more likely to use them, and that we need to continue restricting their ownership. The statistics that I have provided above seem to indicate otherwise. It is my opinion that allowing Canadian citizens to carry concealed firearms would not affect these statistics, consider the following;
    The people applying for a concealed carry permit, would be required to already have a valid PAL and be allowed to obtain and possess restricted (or prohibited) firearms. Over 70% of all firearms in Canada are not registered – approximately 20 million firearms in total with approximately 7 million firearms registered.(3) We are not asking the government to simply let any Canadian citizen obtain this permit, only those that already possess these firearms and use them in a responsible, lawful manner.

    In closing, without political support the chances of a concealed carry permit being reasonably available in Canada is unlikely, however with continued, informed efforts from the public, the support we need may come in time.

    Thank you for reading.

    Sources:
    (1)http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gun_politics_in_Canada
    (2)http://www.johnhoward.ca/trends/firearms.pdf
    (3)http://www.lufa.ca/quickfacts.asp

  6. Brent Says:

    Great article. Keep posting and check out Kateys Firearms Facts on youtube.

    “…the U.S. government trusts Canadian citizens more than our own government?” Awesome quote.

  7. inky mark (mp, ret.) Says:

    americans understand that police can. t protect them 24/7 Canadians are like sheep, believe what the govt feeds them and herded like sheep most of the time. imagine the crime rate in canada when we reach 100 million, we don t know how to handle the criminals now at 34 million, what,s the difference between trained civilians and trained police in the lawful use of anyfirearm, absolutely none.

  8. Alam Says:

    Conceal and carry laws have seriously reduced crime rates in US states to the extent that it has become a no-brainer. Because of the crime reduction precedent several states are now considering open-carry laws. If it saves lives should we in Canada not be more open-minded? Why can’t Canadians protect themselves and be more proactively engaged as private citizens in fighting crime? Is it because the economics of policing, corrections, and security are so lucrative?

  9. Jim K Says:

    Cuckier says, “I don’t think think we need to have a wider debate about carrying concealed weapons and handguns for self protection. It runs contrary to Canadian tradition and it certainly runs contrary to Canadian law”.

    Contrary to Canadian Tradition? since Trudeau passed Bill C-150 in 1969, Cukier is correct, prior to Bill C-150 which prohibited handgun hunting and made carry permits almost impossible to get. It was easy to get permits for concealed carry and for self defense. Canadians actively engaged in this practice.

    Translation: I don’t agree with it, ergo I don’t want to talk about it.

    What I would like to know is when self defence became a bad thing in Canada. Who in hell made that decision for us?

    Once again it Started with Trudeau and his fear of the FLQ (a Quebec Separatist movement) responsible for blowing things up in the 1960s and the October Crises of 1970. It ultimately lead to Bill C-51 in 1977 and when Cukier formed the Coalition for gun Control everything went to hell.

    I also get the distinct feeling that there is a mindset amongst some people that would rather see people dead than be given the opportunity to defend themselves.

    There are a number of groups now that foster Victim Status or Victimhood, It is no longer Socially acceptable in Canada not to be a Victim. groups that supposedly help Victims, need for people to have victim status and a constant supply of new victims to ensure funding for their organizations.

  10. Rick Neuman Says:

    Hmmmm. There’s a relevant point and observation. Victims, victim mentality, and “victimhood”. When I was growing up (in Calgary) and even beyond that, my folks used to tell me that Canadians wanted the government to take care of them (We were from America), hence socialized medicine, welfare, and a other things. I spent 40 of my 64 years in Calgary (now I’m in Colorado) and pretty much grew up in that atmosphere of the sociialization of everything. There certainly were a large number of people who fit into that victim mentality, but there were also a large number who were more independant. I’ve learned, in my 12+ years here that guns are NOT evil, in and of themselves. They are simply tools. My daughter once said to me that the ONLY purpose for the design of handguns is to kill people (never mind handguns used for hunting). Like that, in and of itself, is evil. Not necessarily. The fifth commandment is commonly (as in most of the time) stated as “Thou shalt not kill”. The original text says: “Thou shalt not DO MURDER” (emphasis mine) It is not murder to kill someone in defence of yourself and/or loved ones and/or others under your protection. Yes, guns (of all kinds) were created to kill. However, as Thulsa Doom put it: “What is steel compared to hand that wields it?” Indeed. What is a gun, compared to the hand that wields it?

  11. Jeff Says:

    I do feel as if Canada is quit the unusual place by that I mean nice people and a government which had proven itself to handle crime. However a law abiding citizen who wishes to have a gun should not even be a question 99.9% of the people who will carry will never use such weapon . But does give a sense of security and keep some people at bay from doing stupid things if they think you might be carring

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