Posts Tagged ‘Loyola Law School adjusts GPAs’

Loyola Law School: Improving the GPA

June 26, 2010

This story may not be an exact fit with the social trend to massage everyone sense of self worth and may in fact be as much about University politics as anything, but it comes close.

One day next month every student at Loyola Law School Los Angeles will awake to a higher grade point average.

But it’s not because they are all working harder.

The school is retroactively inflating its grades, tacking on 0.333 to every grade recorded in the last few years. The goal is to make its students look more attractive in a competitive job market.

In the last two years, at least 10 law schools have deliberately changed their grading systems to make them more lenient. These include law schools like New York University and Georgetown, as well as Golden Gate University and Tulane University, which just announced the change this month. Some recruiters at law firms keep track of these changes and consider them when interviewing, and some do not.

The politics?

Law schools seem to view higher grades as one way to rescue their students from the tough economic climate — and perhaps more to the point, to protect their own reputations and rankings. Once able to practically guarantee gainful employment to thousands of students every year, the schools are now fielding complaints from more and more unemployed graduates, frequently drowning in student debt.

Whatever the reason, it seems to me that if you wanted to ensure your graduates a place in the job market you would concentrate on putting out a superior product rather than playing silly bugger with the GPA figures.

However, in the sense of fair play there are opposing opinions.


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